Day 242. A Challenge

How’s this for something completely different?  Today’s post has nothing to do with me.  It’s all about you.  At least that’s what I’m hoping for.  Confused?  Don’t be. wordpress It’s really simple.

Yesterday I wrote about six-word memoirs.  Inspired by how many of you took the time to add your six-word memoirs to “Comments”, when I went to bed last night I thought about how much fun it would be if, somehow, we got the message out to all WordPress bloggers.

If, somehow, we could get thousands and thousands of WordPress bloggers engaged enough in the idea, to submit six-word memoirs of their own.

Make it go viral, in other words.

When I woke up this morning, I was still excited about the idea.  And if I’ve learned anything during my time on this planet, I’ve learned to follow my gut.  When I have a thought, or an idea, that just won’t go away I have to Continue reading

Day 149. Our ‘Schtick’

I’ve never given much thought to my writing habits. Have you? Then the other day a former colleague posted a really interesting piece , from Brain Pickings, on writingschtickFacebook. The particular story I’m referring to, is about famous writers’ daily routines.

Ray Bradbury, for example, wrote everyday. And he wrote everywhere. He didn’t care where he was. He could be wrapped in total silence, or the radio could be blaring. It made no difference to him. He was oblivious to all of it. On the other hand, Jack Kerouac wrote by candlelight, with a drink close at hand, from midnight until dawn.

He also got down on his knees and prayed before getting started. I think most of us say a little prayer, every time we look at a blank screen or sheet of paper. Even if it’s a silent plea, and we do it from the comfort of our desk chairs.

Hemingway was very disciplined. He woke, every day, at 7 am and he’d write between 500 to 1,000 words. Every day. He needed a schedule. And did you know? Supposedly because of a leg injury sustained in the war, he wrote standing up. It’s said (not by him) it increases productivity, fights fatigue, stops you from wanting to nap and helps you ignore distractions.

Just sounds bloody uncomfortable to me.

Do you know who said, “A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a

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