Day 345. A Byline

My friend, Marilyn, is probably the only person, outside of myself, who knows what I’m about to tell you.  Not that there’s any reason for it to be a deep, dark secret.journalist  It’s just something I’ve never talked about, before.

Have no idea why, either.

And the only reason I’m mentioning it now is, because of a recent WordPress Daily Prompt:  “If one experience or life change results from you writing your blog, what would you like it to be?”

I don’t even have to think about it.

You all know I’ve spent my career in advertising.  As a copywriter and creative director.  It’s what I always wanted to do, from the time I was a very young girl.  I’ve worked for some of the largest agencies in the world, on some of the best brands.  And I’ve had a fabulous career.

No complaints.

But outside of the industry, I’ve not been taken seriously, as a writer.  None of us are.  It’s not really a reflection Continue reading

Day 47. Polishing Work

Chris Martin Writes is one of the many WordPress blogs I follow.  Yesterday he wrote about editing one’s work, and how it’s not one of his favourite things to do.  He also wrote about some tools he uses, successfully, to help him make it a more enjoyable process.

I, on the other hand, love it.  In fact, I have to perfect as I go.  Every couple of paragraphs I have to stop, re-read, tweak, polish, change, edit; otherwise I can’t go on. Every writer I’ve ever met, or worked with, has his or her own style.  I had a writer, who once worked for me, who was all about stream of consciousness.  He just had to get it all out and down on paper, without worrying about spelling, grammar, punctuation, flow or anything else.  He  knew it would be all right, in the end.

He’d always give me his first draft to look over.  He wanted to know if he was on the right track, before he invested a whole lot more time and effort.  Fair enough, I suppose.  But as much as I liked him, and his work, every time I’d see him headed for my office, with sheets of paper in his hand, I’d groan.  Because I’d have to read and re-read and re-read his work just to make enough sense of it — before I could figure out if it answered the brief, or not.  And, as a result, for the first fifteen or twenty minutes I’d spend all my time correcting the errors, instead of evaluating the work.

It’s just the way I am.  I get distracted by the imperfections.  I can only read objectively and give thoughtful feedback when I’m looking at a really good draft.  Even when it’s my own work.  I love perfecting work, whether it’s mine or another writer’s.

But I’m lucky.

Very, very early in my career, when I was just starting out, I was given an opportunity to learn a wonderful lesson.  One that has stayed with me, to this day.  I was Continue reading