Blog tour: The writing process

Pete Armetta is a writer whose work I love. I love his thoughts and I love how he expresses them, whether it’s through poetry, short stories, essays or writingquillfiction. Yes, he is that versatile, that able, that talented. I ‘met’ him here, on WordPress; and from the very first moment I read one of his posts I became a fan. And a follower.

Here’s your chance to do the same.

A couple of nights ago he invited me to participate in The Writing Process blog tour. He’d been invited by a friend and fellow blogger. Read what he shared, with just one click.

Some info I knew, some I didn’t. But none of it surprised me. Because along with being a terrific writer, he is committed and passionate and determined.

The Writing Process:

1. What are you working on?

A bit of background, first. My mother used to tell me as far back as when I was 11 or 12 years old, I routinely re-wrote (and re-thought) ads I saw in magazines. So I suppose it wasn’t ‘news’ when I told my parents, at age 15, I wanted to work in advertising.

And it is what I ended up doing. First as a copywriter, then as a creative director — for the Montreal and Toronto offices of some of the world’s biggest

Continue reading

Day 364. Pure Joy …

1Yesterday I was reminded of how much I love the very early hours of the morning.  It made me wonder why I don’t get up earlier morning coffeethan I do each day.  Right then and there,  I resolved to do so.  And all that happened before I was even out of bed.

It was Pete Armetta who inspired me.  It was his blog post.  A  lovely poem about how unusually quiet the streets were; and how it was a moment to be enjoyed and savoured, while it lasted.

Can you identify with it?  I can.  It’s so tranquil and lovely.

The sun’s up, but the city hasn’t woken up yet.  No voices.  No car doors slamming shut.  No engines.  No trucks back firing.  No dogs barking.  No footsteps.  No sirens.  No horns.  No tires screeching.  No sounds of life.  Not a sound. It’s absolutely still.    Continue reading

Day 131. Another Award

Honestly, I don’t know what to say.  I have been getting such a good response to my blog.  I’ve had my fair share of visits, follows, ‘likes’ and comments.  Not so longBlog of the Year Award 1 star jpeg ago the film and travel-loving author of MANNINGTREE ARCHIVE nominated me for the One Lovely Blogger Award .

And last night I returned home from a night out, to find the brains and talent behind one of my favourite blogs, Evil Squirrel’s Nest, had chosen me, (and several other very worthy recipients), for The 2012 Blog of the Year Award.

Over the years in my professional career as a copywriter and creative director, my work has been recognized many, many times.  And I’m very grateful for it.  My greatest satisfaction, however, is when my work is liked by those who read it.  Those who choose to read it.  When they appreciate it.  When they think it is worthy of mention.

When we nominate each other, it’s significant.  Because we’re peers.  Fellow bloggers.  And fellow readers.  There is so much available in the blogosphere.  So much really wonderful, wonderful work.  Which is why I Continue reading

Day 116. Be Brutal

Pete Armetta has a WordPress blog I very much enjoy.  He’s a powerful writer of poetry, flash fiction, essays and short stories; and I’m always struck by how few words he needs, to say so much.  Which, incidentally, is much easier said that done.  His ‘style’ brings to mind a favourite Mark Twain quote:

“I am sorry to have written such a long letter, but I did not have time to write a short one”.

Says it all.   Because the true measure of a writer is the ability to self-edit.  To be ruthless.  To choose words carefully.  To make every one work hard.  And having talent is the least of it.  It takes discipline.  Love of the craft.  The ability to let go.  To love ’em, but leave ’em, on the cutting room floor.  To know when you’re done.

So really, a writer’s best friend isn’t a computer.  Or a dictionary.  Or a thesaurus.  It’s the eraser.

Luckily, I learned that very early in my career. It was hard.  And painful.  But the best thing that could ever have happened to a young writer, just starting out.  Which is why I wrote a blog post about it.

When I commented on Pete’s poem, and how much I admire his ability to keep only what’s absolutely essential, he responded, Continue reading